Fil mjolk yogurt

Cheese, Kim Chee, and other fermented or pickled foods.

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Fil mjolk yogurt

Postby gin » Tue Apr 11, 2006 11:18 am

Do you like buttermilk? I didn’t. That is, before I tried fil mjolk. No kidding fil mjolk is just wonderful. It’s a drinkable yogurt that taste like buttermilk, only better. I use it in all my recipes calling for buttermilk. And they taste good. They say you can make cheese with it. I haven’t tried that yet. If someone has, could you post about it? I’d like to learn about more ways to use it. You can get it at: http://www.fermentedtreasures.com They have a lot of good stuff. The direct link is: http://www.fermentedtreasures.com/yogurt.html
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Postby Kinsman » Tue Apr 11, 2006 11:31 am

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Postby gin » Wed Apr 12, 2006 5:09 am

How RUDE to call my post SPAM.

I asked for help and shared information. I thought that is what we do on these boards. I found a product I really like and want to share it and learn more about how to make use of it. If that is spam, then these boards are pointless. If you have something beneficial to tell me about how to use fil mjolk, please do. I would like to know how to make cheese and butter with it. Do you know how?
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Postby MeadMeister » Wed Apr 12, 2006 5:20 am

gin wrote:How RUDE to call my post SPAM.


I agree. I'm not sure what else was expected in the fermented foods section.

gin wrote:I would like to know how to make cheese and butter with it. Do you know how?


I made a few cheeses a long time ago. I'll tell you what I remember and hope it helps, if it sounds like something you want to do be sure and check over my info with a real book. :D Keep in mind I was not starting with yogurt, so your guess is as good as mine for much of this transfers. I didn't reply initially because I'm light on the details with milk and have zero experience with fil mjolk.

Process began by keeping the milk warm on the stove and letting it sour / curdle for something like an hour. Then the curds were cut and the whole bit strained out to separate the curds from the whey. I was more interested in hard cheeses so I dumped the whey but in other cheeses you use it. Hard cheeses are also pressed, so once the curds were strained out real well they were wrapped up and put into the press to get out as much whey as possible. The whole bit was sealed in wax and tucked away (a lagering fridge might be perfect for this). That's a very rough overview as I remember. There were a couple things to add, such as rennet, also.

As for butter I was under the impression this was simply a matter of mixing the milk (or presumably fil mjolk in your case) at a low speed for a long time. One of those electronic ice cream makers would probably be a neat little adaptation for this. Let me know if you learn any more about it because now you've got me wondering if I should try to make some organic butter at home. :lol:
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Postby gin » Wed Apr 12, 2006 1:02 pm

Thank you for sharing your cheese making information with me. You got me to thinking. I do have an old book on cheese making packed up in a box in one of my closets that I haven’t seen for years. I’m going to find it and dust it off. I did receive a recipe with the fil mjolk for soft cheese that I’m about to try out but I thought that cheese required rennet. Now I know the difference that that is for hard cheese and not soft. Thank you for telling me. Your Idea about the butter reminds of an old trick about putting mayonnaise in the blender and whipping it up as a butter substitute. Now, I wonder if the cultured milk or just plain old sweet cream would make better butter. I like the idea of churning my own butter. Just might consider getting an electronic ice cream maker for that one. Again, thanks!
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Postby MeadMeister » Wed Apr 12, 2006 5:06 pm

Let me know how the churning goes - still tempted myself :)

I'm also not sure about the rennet for hard but not soft. I'm pretty sure but I always went by a book recipe.
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