Pulque

Cheese, Kim Chee, and other fermented or pickled foods.

Moderator: Moderator Team

Pulque

Postby Bender » Sun Jun 11, 2006 10:03 pm

Years ago I was watching Tony Bordain on the food network and he was eating his way around Mexico. I think it was after the iguana tamales that his friend took him to a pulque bar and they drank this crazy, white, slimy, and highly alcoholic substance called pulque.

Anyone else heard of this brew or had it?

I've been curious about it since I saw it. I suppose since I live five minutes from Mexico I should go and find out for myself, but I was wondering if anyone else has had any experience with it.
Bender: "Well, well, baby wants a Zima."
Leela: "Hey, hey. We can all fight when we are drunk. Now listen. Why don't we just brew our own beer?"
Bender: "You can brew your own beer?"
Leela: "Sure. The kids at the orphanarium used to do it all the time."
User avatar
Bender
Pint Glass (25 posts)
 
Posts: 90
Joined: Sat May 27, 2006 9:22 am
Location: Yuma, Arizona

Postby masher44 » Sun Jun 11, 2006 10:52 pm

It's a drink from the Maguay cactus juices fermented with wild organisms. Sort of a crude precursor to tequilla I think.
User avatar
masher44
Liter Mug (100 posts)
 
Posts: 179
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2006 10:21 pm
Location: Dana Point , CA

Postby Backglass » Mon Jun 12, 2006 6:00 am

masher44 wrote:Sort of a crude precursor to tequilla I think.


Exactly. Tequila, Mezcal & Pulque are all made from the same family of Agaves though different plants.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulque

Think of Pulque as unfiltered Tequila Homebrew.
Barry - NY

"A brewer is YOU!"

--------


On Tap: Jamil's Chocolate Hazelnut Porter, Gnome Rootbeer, Hard Lemonade, Schwartzbier
Conditioning: Rogue I2PA
Fermenting: ---
Starter: ---
User avatar
Backglass
Barrel (1000 posts)
 
Posts: 1353
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2005 4:37 pm
Location: Putnam County, NY

Postby Bender » Mon Jun 12, 2006 7:41 am

Has anyone here experimented with it?
Bender: "Well, well, baby wants a Zima."
Leela: "Hey, hey. We can all fight when we are drunk. Now listen. Why don't we just brew our own beer?"
Bender: "You can brew your own beer?"
Leela: "Sure. The kids at the orphanarium used to do it all the time."
User avatar
Bender
Pint Glass (25 posts)
 
Posts: 90
Joined: Sat May 27, 2006 9:22 am
Location: Yuma, Arizona

Postby Bender » Mon Jun 12, 2006 7:51 am

Was it really slimy or smooth like honey? When I saw it on tv it looked a great deal like slime; at the same time, they made it seem like the guys were "trippin balls" :lol: drinking the stuff. Any such experience?
Bender: "Well, well, baby wants a Zima."
Leela: "Hey, hey. We can all fight when we are drunk. Now listen. Why don't we just brew our own beer?"
Bender: "You can brew your own beer?"
Leela: "Sure. The kids at the orphanarium used to do it all the time."
User avatar
Bender
Pint Glass (25 posts)
 
Posts: 90
Joined: Sat May 27, 2006 9:22 am
Location: Yuma, Arizona

Postby Bender » Mon Jun 12, 2006 8:49 am

Well, the show said that they let it ferment in old bathtubs, and I also think that other than the natural yeast, all they use is the agave and water - I think. I want to do a little more searching on this. :D
Bender: "Well, well, baby wants a Zima."
Leela: "Hey, hey. We can all fight when we are drunk. Now listen. Why don't we just brew our own beer?"
Bender: "You can brew your own beer?"
Leela: "Sure. The kids at the orphanarium used to do it all the time."
User avatar
Bender
Pint Glass (25 posts)
 
Posts: 90
Joined: Sat May 27, 2006 9:22 am
Location: Yuma, Arizona

Postby bushwack » Mon Jun 19, 2006 8:48 pm

Pulque is.

Pulque is a milky, slightly foamy and somewhat viscous beverage made by fermenting (not distilling) the fresh sap of certain types of Maguey. Any other beverage made from distilling the cooked Maguey is Mezcal, and if it is manufactured in the Tequila region from a numbered distillery, it is Tequila. All three drinks are made from different species of Maguey, often called the "Century plant" in English. The Maguey or agave are all members of the botanical family Agavaceae.

Only one species of Maguey is allowed by law for tequila production, the agave Weber (the Blue Agave). There are many species that can be used for good mezcal, and six or so varieties will yield the basic juice for flavorful Pulque.

Pulque appears in pre-Hispanic "history" about 1000 A.D. A joyous mural called the "Pulque Drinkers" was unearthed in 1968 during excavations at the Great Pyramid in Cholula, Puebla, 70 miles east of Mexico City.
From many graphic indications, it is obvious that pulque was not a new thing when the mural was painted; the drink is at least 2,000 years old. It is the sap, called aguamiel or honey water, that becomes pulque through a natural fermentation process which can occur within the plant, but usually takes place at a "Tinacal" (place of production).

The beverage became such an important element socially, economically and, as a consequence, religiously, that myths, legends and cults proliferated around it and its source, the maguey.
In the great Indian civilizations of the central highlands, Pulque was served as a ritual intoxicant for priests-to increase their enthusiasm, for sacrificial victims-to ease their passing, and as a medicinal drink. Pulque was also served as a liquor reserved to celebrate the feats of the brave and the wise, and was even considered to be an acceptable substitute for blood in some propitiatory ceremonies.
Today the giant pulque maguey (the most common being the San Francisco Tlaculapan) are first processed after 12 years of growth. Often an outstanding plant will have an initiation attended by the local governor in honor of a potentially long production cycle. A good plant can produce for up to 1 year. The center of the maguey is regularly scraped out activating the plants production of aguamiel. A local custom for a man without sons is to process 6 plants, make and drink a special pulque, and then make sons. The drink is often considered a mythic aphrodisiac. The name Tlyaol is given to a good strain that makes one particularly virile.

Pulque is frequently the potion of choice used by women during menstruation and lactation.
There are various pulque maguey types. The Blanco (female) is common and produces pups (baby magueys growing at its base) after three years. The pups are replanted away from the adult and begin to mature themselves. Other types are: 1) Manzon (more fine); 2) Prieto (compact); 3) Colorado (no pups); and 4) Macuetlas (flexible thorns).
Todays growers and makers of pulque believe that the plants receive cosmic energy and genrously give it back every day. They consider it different than wine since it is said to bring strength to the body yet not displace one's clarity. Drinking pulque gives one a big appetite.
The goddess Mayahuel discovered pulque. The pulque gods generally were related to the beneficent deities of water, of rain and thus of agriculture. There was a picturesque group of gods called the Centzon Totochtin or 400 (a synonym for innumerable) rabbits. According to a now generally accepted interpretation, these deities represent the infinite number of forms intoxication takes in individuals of different temperaments and customs.
Ometotchtli, or Two Rabbit, was generally regarded as the supreme god of pulque - no mention is ever made of one rabbit. Another notable of the 400 was Tepoztecatl, a regional deity who gave his name to Tepoztlan, near Cuernavaca.
The article goes on and on, maybe the result of a hearty sampling of the nectar in question ......................
Carl : In Laconia NH
"Use it up, Wear it out Or do without."
bushwack
Pint Glass (25 posts)
 
Posts: 72
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:41 pm
Location: Laconia, New Hampshire

Postby bushwack » Mon Jun 19, 2006 8:52 pm

SORRY!!!
Didn't realize that would end up so lenthy
Carl : In Laconia NH
"Use it up, Wear it out Or do without."
bushwack
Pint Glass (25 posts)
 
Posts: 72
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:41 pm
Location: Laconia, New Hampshire

Postby Bender » Tue Jun 20, 2006 11:26 am

If I were to buy the extract I would want to make pulque, not just add it to my beer. From what I read, though, the way it is made is closely guarded by the people that make it.

Last week when I was down in Mexico I asked a bartender about pulque and he just gave me a dirty look, then proceeded to give me a margarita without an ounce of alcohol. I plan to keep on searching, though.
Bender: "Well, well, baby wants a Zima."
Leela: "Hey, hey. We can all fight when we are drunk. Now listen. Why don't we just brew our own beer?"
Bender: "You can brew your own beer?"
Leela: "Sure. The kids at the orphanarium used to do it all the time."
User avatar
Bender
Pint Glass (25 posts)
 
Posts: 90
Joined: Sat May 27, 2006 9:22 am
Location: Yuma, Arizona

Postby pprrado » Thu Mar 22, 2007 5:06 am

hi in zumergy is a recipe for a mad recipe using agave nectar, pulque is made by fermenting the heart of the agave in the sand, the process is really the same to make a kind of bbq in mexico, (im from mexico), they do a hole trow a bunch of smokin red charcoal put it in a bag and let it cook for like a week, after that, they ferment the agave nectar, and they got pulque....
pprrado
Corny Keg (500 posts)
 
Posts: 611
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:57 pm


Return to Fermented Foods

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests