Going to make some cheese, need help with recipe

Cheese, Kim Chee, and other fermented or pickled foods.

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Going to make some cheese, need help with recipe

Postby Gabe » Thu Sep 29, 2005 10:50 am

I am trying to find out how I will go about making a Mimolette. Anybody done this cheese before?
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Postby alewife » Fri Sep 30, 2005 7:39 pm

I've made several cheeses before, but not this specific one. If you will share the recipe though, I am willing to give your questions a try! :)

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Postby alewife » Fri Sep 30, 2005 7:47 pm

You know I just re read your post? Would this be your first cheese??? The Mimolette type would be quite an undertaking. Do you have any equipment? This cheese gets pressed and then aged for quite a while... You might be better off starting with a mozzarella or a monterey jack or even an herbed fresh cream cheese til you get real equipment and get the hang of it. (No pun intended there!) Alewife
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Postby Stein » Mon Oct 10, 2005 10:02 pm

What is the easiest cheese to try in terms of both skill and equipment? I would like to give it a shot.
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Postby Brewhockey » Tue Oct 11, 2005 9:59 am

Cream or cottage cheese are both pretty easy. You add some rennit and strain the curds with cheese cloth. Minimal equipment and short turn-around time from making to eating.
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Postby BeerPal » Tue Oct 11, 2005 10:27 am

Stein wrote:What is the easiest cheese to try in terms of both skill and equipment? I would like to give it a shot.


I have been considering cheesemaking as well. Most of the research I've done indicates (as brewhockey alludes) that soft cheeses are easiest to make (also requires minimal equipment) and mozzarella seems to be what most beginners I've come across start with.
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Postby alewife » Tue Oct 11, 2005 10:05 pm

Yes, soft natural cream cheeses (also ricotta, farmer's cheese and cottage cheese) are extremely easy to make with a minimum of equipment. Much of it you may have already-- colanders, thermometers, strainers, etc. Other stuff, like cheesecloth and rennet are fairly easily obtained. Cheesemaking is much like beer brewing with respect to the need for sanitation and careful temperature control.

I am happy to share with you my own recipes for fresh ricotta, fresh cream cheese, and fresh monterey jack cheese. They are somewhat lengthy to type into this format, so PM me and we can figure out the best way to get them to you. Also some of my recipes are copywritten and I don't want them flying all over the internet.

You can also often get fresh mozzarella curd at specialty or Italian deli's and process it yourself into the little balls that are so popular now, without having to make the cheese yourself. I can let you know how to do that, too.


Anyway, let me know if you'd like the recipes. Fresh cheese is really one of the more delicious treats you can make for yourself! :wink: Alewife
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Postby leosmith78 » Wed Oct 12, 2005 8:11 am

I would like to get into cheese making. Is there any good websites out there that teach the basics?
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Postby Brewhockey » Wed Oct 12, 2005 10:16 am

leosmith78 wrote:I would like to get into cheese making. Is there any good websites out there that teach the basics?


This is a good site for info and ingredients: http://www.cheesemaking.com/

Her book is a really good resource for the beginner.
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Postby bullitt » Sat Nov 12, 2005 5:52 pm

alewife wrote:I've made several cheeses before, but not this specific one. If you will share the recipe though, I am willing to give your questions a try! :)

Alewife


Hello ALewife,

I am looking into cheese presses, and wonder what it is you use?
Did you buy a press or did you make your own. I'm starting with a soft cheese and want to move to a cheddar soon.

Thanks for the advice
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Postby alewife » Sat Nov 12, 2005 6:38 pm

You won't need a cheese press for soft cheeses -- Just strainers, bowls, cheese cloth and thermometers, etc. You may have all that already. For the press, go to leeners.com, they have an inexpensive one to start out with for about $25. That's all I have for the small amounts of cheese I make. They also have just about anything else you'd need to get started in cheesemaking, too! :)

I started with cottage cheese, cream cheese (some flavored with herbs), yogurt cheeses, etc., and I would suggest that you do the same. Start small and build. Like with brewing, don't jump into AG all at once! Cream and yogurt cheeses are the absolute easiest, next comes cottage cheese and farmer's cheese, ricotta, etc. Then you would be ready for a mozzarella, and after that, a monterey jack. It would be then that I think you could consider getting into the cheddars, etc. -- wouldn't be such a big jump at that point. Jack cheese can be made without a press, but if you are really going to age it, then get the press! And, then, you would be at the "wax" stage, too. Alewife
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Postby bullitt » Sun Nov 13, 2005 6:25 pm

alewife wrote:You won't need a cheese press for soft cheeses -- Just strainers, bowls, cheese cloth and thermometers, etc. You may have all I started with cottage cheese, cream cheese (some flavored with herbs), yogurt cheeses, etc., and I would suggest that you do the same. Start small and build. Like with brewing, don't jump into AG all at once! Cream and yogurt cheeses are the absolute easiest, next comes cottage cheese and farmer's cheese, ricotta, etc. Then you would be ready for a mozzarella, and after that, a monterey jack. It would be then that I think you could consider getting into the cheddars, etc. -- wouldn't be such a big jump at that point. Jack cheese can be made without a press, but if you are really going to age it, then get the press! And, then, you would be at the "wax" stage, too. Alewife


Thanks for the tips, there are so many recipes on the net its easy to get ahead of myself, I will start with a cream cheese and build up to the cheddars, my kids are dieing to help make cheddar cheese :lol:
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Postby alewife » Sun Nov 13, 2005 8:22 pm

Yeah, they'll especially like it when it gets to that "yucky", "curdy", and "smelly" stage!!! --- The cheddar will get to that stage, the cream and yogurt cheeses won't phase them! I just told my kids, the worse it smelled, the better it would taste! Have fun and if you need any other help, recipes, etc. just PM me! Alewife
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