How to carbonate sankey kegs in a brewery???

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How to carbonate sankey kegs in a brewery???

Postby Stormcooker » Sun Sep 23, 2007 7:45 am

Can someone explain to me how brewpubs and breweries carbonate multiple sankey kegs at one time? I don't understand how you measure how much co2 you are injecting into a keg, to get consistant results evrytime. Do they just hook up their kegs to co2 at a set pressure, and leave it for a set period of time?

I keg at home with cornys, and my method is to force-carbonate while shaking the keg. Sometimes I get a little over-carb and sometimes I get under-carb and I just adjust it in my kegerator by releasing head pressure, or increasing serving pressure which helps inject more co2 into over a day or so.

I know some places use serving tanks, and may fill their kegs with carbonated beer, I'm not interested in that process. I'd like to know how to do it with precision starting with uncarbonated beer.
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Re: How to carbonate sankey kegs in a brewery???

Postby HiGravity » Sun Sep 23, 2007 7:55 am

Stormcooker wrote:Can someone explain to me how brewpubs and breweries carbonate multiple sankey kegs at one time? I don't understand how you measure how much co2 you are injecting into a keg, to get consistant results evrytime. Do they just hook up their kegs to co2 at a set pressure, and leave it for a set period of time?

I keg at home with cornys, and my method is to force-carbonate while shaking the keg. Sometimes I get a little over-carb and sometimes I get under-carb and I just adjust it in my kegerator by releasing head pressure, or increasing serving pressure which helps inject more co2 into over a day or so.

I know some places use serving tanks, and may fill their kegs with carbonated beer, I'm not interested in that process. I'd like to know how to do it with precision starting with uncarbonated beer.


Do a search for "c02 carbonation chart". It's a matter of determining the temperature of the beer and determine what PSI your regulator needs to be set to for a certain volume of co2. The colder the beer, the quicker the c02 is absorbed. By shaking the keg, you are allowing more of the beer to be exposed to the c02, and as you mentioned it's hit or miss sometimes. If you can wait a week, just hook the keg up to the gas and wait. You won't have to worry about under/over carbing at that point.
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Postby WingStall » Sun Sep 23, 2007 9:06 am

I'm sure there's an exception somewhere, but in general, breweries and brewpubs don't carbonate in their kegs. The beer is carbonated either by force or naturally or by a combination of the two before it gets kegged.
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Postby bstein » Sun Sep 23, 2007 9:14 am

WingStall wrote:I'm sure there's an exception somewhere, but in general, breweries and brewpubs don't carbonate in their kegs. The beer is carbonated either by force or naturally or by a combination of the two before it gets kegged.


Yup commercially they keg under pressure to minimize foaming and to hold all the co2 till it is sealed for delivery.
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