Geisha by Naga Saki (Nigori Genshu)

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Geisha by Naga Saki (Nigori Genshu)

Postby mmadia » Tue Jul 08, 2008 4:24 pm

While browsing around at a local store, a bottle of this caught my eye.

Typically, I'm a fan of Gekkeikan sake.
However, I've had Naga Saki's regular sake in the blue bottle.

So after having a quick read at Talyor site again, it seems that "muroka" sake can be made by chilling and decanting the nigori genshu.
Is there anything I'm missing?
And what is "lees", as in "has been pressed from the kasu lees"?
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Re: Geisha by Naga Saki (Nigori Genshu)

Postby Taylor-MadeAK » Wed Jul 09, 2008 12:21 am

mmadia wrote:So after having a quick read at Talyor site again, it seems that "muroka" sake can be made by chilling and decanting the nigori genshu.
Is there anything I'm missing?

Nope, that's exactly what muroka is.

Well, that was easy! Now, on to the biggie:

mmadia wrote:And what is "lees", as in "has been pressed from the kasu lees"?

In any kind of fermentation, the term "lees" refers to the sediment on the bottom of the fermenter after fermentation has completed. When making wine and beer, the yeast and other turbidity will naturally settle out on the bottom of the fermenter or cask over time. With the exception of red wine with its grape skins, there's usually very little in the way of solid material to be removed, and all of it is heavy enough to sink.

Sake is a bit different, though. Even after polishing, not all of the rice kernel is starch that can be broken down by the koji. Some of it is just plain indigestible to both koji and yeast, so you have a pretty substantial amount of solid material left when fermentation is complete. To make matters worse, it's porous and it floats! Still, it's leftover solid material, which qualifies it as lees. In order to get the most sake out of a batch, those lees must be pressed in much the same manner that grapes or other fruit must be pressed for wine.

Once pressed, the Japanese call this material kasu. Kasu that has been hand-pressed by the homebrewer (me) looks like this:

Image

Don't throw that stuff out! That's some darn useful stuff, if you enjoy Japanese cuisine. Here are some ideas of what you can do with it.
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Re: Geisha by Naga Saki (Nigori Genshu)

Postby baltobrewer » Thu Jul 10, 2008 8:56 am

Damn, dude, it doesn't seem there's much about sake you *don't* know. Nice answer. BTW, I don't think Naga is worth the coin, personally. Maybe my palate is just juvenile when it comes to sake, but I find Gekkiekan Gold to be very clean and floral. Not much improvement for the Naga.

Not to hijack the thread, but for us Sake newbies, could you (or anyone) recommend some key examples of various styles that we could try in order to expand our palates a bit. I love sake but am a bit overwhelmed as to what style to choose, etc.

Thanks!
Jay
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Re: Geisha by Naga Saki (Nigori Genshu)

Postby Taylor-MadeAK » Fri Jul 11, 2008 10:57 pm

baltobrewer wrote:Damn, dude, it doesn't seem there's much about sake you *don't* know. Nice answer.

I've been homebrewing for quite a while, and homebrewing sake nearly as long. There don't seem to be many people on the internet who are willing to answer questions about making sake while there is a rising interest among homebrewers for making it, so I try to fill the void as best as I can. I'm no Fred Eckhardt, but I get by. :mrgreen:

baltobrewer wrote:Not to hijack the thread, but for us Sake newbies, could you (or anyone) recommend some key examples of various styles that we could try in order to expand our palates a bit. I love sake but am a bit overwhelmed as to what style to choose, etc.

I don't want to further overwhelm you by suggesting multiple brands, so I'll just expound upon my favorite commercial sake producer.

I really like the sake that SakeOne makes. Not just because they're the only American owned and operated sake kura in the world, but because they've totally embraced the Pacific Northwest spirit of craft brewing. Their sakes are allowed to settle out naturally and then filtered just enough to remove the remaining haze. The result is a very pale yellow ginjo sake that isn't much lighter than my own homebrewed sake (which is made from store-bought rice), but absolutely colorless like some other brands I can name. I haven't yet been able to sample all of their products (their genshu sake doesn't seem to make it up here for some reason), but what I've tried so far has been nothing short of excellent. The fact that they're all reasonably priced (about $11 for a 750ml bottle) just makes it that much better.

Here are some stylistic examples with corresponding links:

Genshu (undiluted) sake: SakeOne "G" - I haven't been able to try this one yet.

Junmai ginjo: SakeOne Momokawa Diamond - this one is very very close in flavor to my homebrew sake, once you allow for my sake being stronger in alcohol.

Nigorizake: SakeOne Momokawa Pearl - this is the nigorizake version of Momokawa Diamond.

Infused sake: SakeOne Moonstone series - if you're into flavored sake, I imagine these would be right up your alley. I'm not, so I've never tried one.
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Re: Geisha by Naga Saki (Nigori Genshu)

Postby baltobrewer » Mon Jul 14, 2008 7:29 am

Rockin. Thanks man.....
Jay
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Re: Geisha by Naga Saki (Nigori Genshu)

Postby stardust » Wed Jul 16, 2008 1:09 am

Moonstone Plum
This isn't your grandpa's plum wine. We marry premium Ginjo saké with natural plum flavor and a hint of almond. Rich, ripe plum fills the air and tempts your taste buds as this sweet nectar hits your lips. Sweet plum delights your palate without the sugary thickness of plum wines.

Thanks for the post Taylor
Now I have some idea of what the plum sake I am going to make should taste like.
Yes making soon, :oops: will seed the mould spores Friday or Sunday at the latest :D
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Re: Geisha by Naga Saki (Nigori Genshu)

Postby Taylor-MadeAK » Wed Jul 16, 2008 1:41 am

Good to hear, stardust. Feel free to shoot me e-mails through my site if you have questions or just want to keep me posted. :D
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Re: Geisha by Naga Saki (Nigori Genshu)

Postby stardust » Wed Jul 16, 2008 3:00 pm

Taylor-MadeAK wrote:Good to hear, stardust. Feel free to shoot me e-mails through my site if you have questions or just want to keep me posted. :D

Absolutely :!: :D
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Re: Geisha by Naga Saki (Nigori Genshu)

Postby bababa3216 » Thu Feb 25, 2016 12:05 am

Feel free to shoot me e-mails through my site if you have questions or just want to keep me posted.
คาสิโนออนไลน์ไทย
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