Sake

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Sake

Postby JP » Mon Mar 28, 2005 1:10 pm

If anyone is interested in brewing Sake at home, we just got in a great little kit for it: http://www.morebeer.com/product.html?product_id=6004

I have used it a few times, and the sake that comes out is actually pretty good. The process is easy - just add hot water to the ingredients and that it. Check it out. If anyone tries it, please let me know how it comes out.
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Postby thayne » Mon Mar 28, 2005 2:52 pm

From the decription it looks like it only makes 1/4 gallon. Is that right?
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Postby JP » Mon Mar 28, 2005 2:55 pm

Yeah, it is a small amount ... the only downside ...
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sake

Postby wrplace » Mon Mar 28, 2005 7:22 pm

Do you plan to put the components of the kit on the website separately? I have everything but the Koji.
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Postby JP » Mon Mar 28, 2005 7:44 pm

No, the kit comes to us already mixed together.
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Postby marketfixr » Mon Mar 28, 2005 8:56 pm

What is the potential alchol of sake, I have never tried it commercially so I have no clue what it tastes like.

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Postby baltobrewer » Tue Mar 29, 2005 9:54 am

Sake is usually wine strength. Some sakes that are left with residual sugars (doboroku, for ex) can be lighter, while the more refined ginjos and junmais can be upwards of 16%. Bear in mind that all sake's are cut with water post fermentation to make them more palatable, so you determine the final alc %.

This is for all-grain (all-rice??) versions. Not sure about B3's kit....
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Postby JP » Tue Mar 29, 2005 11:31 am

Ours is all rice as well. The Doburoku is ... interesting. The texture is odd to me. I am not a sake drinker by any means, but it's a fun thing to do.
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Postby baltobrewer » Tue Mar 29, 2005 4:02 pm

JP wrote:The Doburoku is ... interesting. The texture is odd to me.


LOL, yeah, a little like thin lumpy alcoholic cream of wheat...
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Filtering sake

Postby timothykinney » Wed Dec 14, 2005 10:12 am

Okay, you you make the sake and the yeast (koji?) are happy it ferments and now you have something that will get you drunk. What about filtering?

All the good sake I've ever had (and it's one of my favorite drinks) has been filtered until it is perfectly clear. The kind that has residual white clouds is crappy by comparison and was traditionally reserved for the peasant classes.

Does the B3 kit have instructions for the filtering process? Any suggestions on this? I would almost suggest distillation and then cutting with water, but I'm not an experienced brewer...

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Postby khu » Wed Dec 14, 2005 11:06 am

I'm a big fan of the refined ginjo and daiginjo sakes as well, and they are always crystal clear. I wonder if there's a proces you could do to just settle out the sediments?
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Postby wrplace » Wed Dec 14, 2005 11:57 am

I was planning to give sake as x-mas gifts but mine didn't clear as I expected. It has been in the primary for months because it took that long for any separation to occur. I made a 3 gal batch that I intended to go all the way to 6 gal, but I got lazy. So, for the 3 gal volume of rice/water mix, it looks like I will be able to draw off 1 gallon of hazy liquid. My understanding is that the liquid is futher settled and maybe fined with bentonite or another clarifier. I also might try filtering through activated charcoal this week.
http://www.exchangenet.net/thormodsen/sake.htm
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Filtering Sake

Postby timothykinney » Thu Dec 15, 2005 9:51 am

Bentonite clay? Would you just pass the cloudy solution through a layer of clay?

Wouldn't activated carbon remove some of the characteristic organics? I think the aroma and/or some of the subtle flavors could be lost.

Does anyone know of a Japanese method for filtering sake?

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Homebrewing sake article by a Japanese person

Postby timothykinney » Thu Dec 15, 2005 5:30 pm

http://brewery.org/library/sake_MH0796.html

This is a good article written by Mutsuo Hoshido that details a Japanese method for homebrewing. Apparently, "industrial" sake has different practices than homebrew sake.

Another site, http://www.esake.com/Knowledge/Making-Sake/making-sake.html
Mentions industrial brewers using charcoal to filter the sake and make it crystal clear, so this seems to be an accepted method.

In either case, the koji seems to be the most important part, with the rice coming in a close second. If you're interested in brewing sake I recommend reading both of these articles to get an idea what the Japanese think (who invented the sake we know and love...unless you consider that the Chinese invented it and the Japanese altered it to suit them, but I digress).

I hope this helps.
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Re: Filtering Sake

Postby wrplace » Thu Dec 22, 2005 7:42 pm

timothykinney wrote:Bentonite clay? Would you just pass the cloudy solution through a layer of clay?

Wouldn't activated carbon remove some of the characteristic organics? I think the aroma and/or some of the subtle flavors could be lost.

-Tim


The clay is added to the secondary to help settle out the solids. I looked at the originl recipe and found that Fred Eckart actually recommends Sparkaloid in the zymurgy article I had read this year. I'm planning to add that too. I tried adding bentonite and it settled okay, but the lees are very fluffy. I going to have to revisit what clarifiers I have and which will work best to further pack the lees.
I also tried running some of the milky pressed liquid through a coffee filter and it plugged it without releasing a drop. The brew can't be more than "hazy" before you pass it through the coffee filter.
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