Whirly-Pop?

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Whirly-Pop?

Postby djbrewer » Sun Jan 07, 2007 11:20 am

Whoo Hoo! First post!
Question: I'm about to pull the trigger on beginning to home roast. There is quite a gap in $ between the whily-pop and the iRoast. Should I just go right to the iRoast or is the Whirly-Pop way something that I will satisfied with?
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Postby catsdrinkbeer » Sun Jan 07, 2007 4:32 pm

i have the whirley pop and have not been satisfied.
I'm using a propane camping stove that gets very hot, but I cannot seem to get my temps high enough.

the whirly pop is thin aluminum, i think that may be part of the problem.
I have tried various ways to roast but by the the time I reach roasting temp, my beans are as dark as i want them.

I fi had to do it over again, I'd spend th money and get something better.
I'd be curious to hear from someone else too.
good luck
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Postby Lee Theuriet » Sun Jan 07, 2007 9:01 pm

I sure like my Z & D from bb & mb. I does a great job with good control. I've never used the whirley pop.

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Postby cooldaddybeck » Mon Jan 08, 2007 9:40 am

I've been happy with my whirly-pop on the stove (gas stove). The gears have gotten a little gummed up, and I've been too lazy to ship it back to Casey for a replacement. Maybe this week...

:0)
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Postby The Amazing Tuna » Mon Jan 15, 2007 8:43 pm

I am covered in Chaff right now. I had to reply because it is right on topic for me, and I just got done roasting a great batch and needed to tell some one other than my wife, who only cares that she has coffee in the morning, not so much where it came from or who roasted it.

I bought the whippy pop thing and it malfunctioned with in three roasts. I called B3 and they, needless to say, treated me right. Without hesitation they made good on the deal, even though I think I was partly to blame for the failure of the instrument.

I purchased a Bayou Classic cast iron gumbo pot, drilled a whole in the top, ran a peice of all thread down the middle, connected a wire agitator, used some knife making supplies to attatch a crank, and blamo!!! I made a cast iron whippy pop.

I just cranked out a pound and a half. It is very even in color. I kept the temp down, and this made it easy to control. Aroma is great. I can't waite until tomarow morning.
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Postby swede sd » Sun Jan 21, 2007 8:03 am

Awesome, sounds like one he#@ of a roaster I think I need to hear more about this thing. I started with a hot air popper, moved to a whirly-pop, then to a Hot Top. The whirly-pop is still one of my favorite ways to roast. I use it on a gas stove, with 11oz of beans.------------------Any pictures of this new heavy duty whirly-popper? What kind of pot and lid did you use?
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Postby The Amazing Tuna » Sun Jan 21, 2007 11:25 am

Apparently I need to learn how to use photo bucket in order to post photos in this forum. I will look into that soon.

Here is a link to the cast iron pot I used to make my roaster.

http://www.bayouclassicdepot.com/7419_jambalaya_pot.htm

The thing is massive. It weighs at least 30 pounds, but I have roasted about two pounds at one time with out any problem.

Once you heat it up, the thick cast iron does an amazing job of distributing the heat evenly. The only thing I would have done differently is maybe gone with a Lodge cast iron dutch oven. The one thing is, and I don't know if this is mythical thinking or not, the jambalaya pot has a curved botton. That is why I purchased it. The curved bottom, in my opinion, keeps the beans from hiding in the corners of a square bottom pan, thus preventing scorching.

The only thing I have to say is that it takes a little getting used to. My first couple batches had some beans that got a little black. The coffee still tasted great though.
Beer is good food.
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Postby swede sd » Mon Jan 22, 2007 4:21 pm

Thanks, I'll give um a look.
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Thanks for the replies guys

Postby djbrewer » Tue Jan 23, 2007 6:21 pm

Hey, thanks for the input/experiences everyone.
I've decided that I'll wait and save up for an iRoast. I don't like the idea of depending on another plug-in-the-wall machine, but it appears to be the simple, consistent method of assuring a quality roast. Next paycheck I guess . . .
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Postby cooldaddybeck » Fri Feb 02, 2007 9:27 am

My favorite feature on the Whirley Pop is that I can roast 8 oz at a time for a small investment. The next step in automated roasters that can handle 8 oz is quite expensive, $1000 or more I believe.
Water, Grain, Hops, Yeast: combine, age, consume.

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"If there is anything that this horrible tragedy can teach us, it's that a male model's life is a precious, precious commodity. Just because we have chiseled abs and stunning features, it doesn't mean that we too can't not die in a freak gasoline fight accident. " ~Derek Zoolander
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Postby RGB_roast_grind_brew » Sun Feb 11, 2007 4:05 pm

I strongly recommend that you start with a combination of the Whirly-Pop and a hot air popper. You need a camping/outdoor stove for the Whirly-Pop. You need an operable kitchen window or an outdoor plug for the air popper.

I need two batches from the air popper to last four days. It is better for lighter roasts. See my comments in air popper above.

The Whirly-Pop will roast 16 oz, which is way too much for our house. Use 8 oz at a time. I find the Whirly-pop better for full city + to french roast. There is so much smoke with 16 oz beans, that I personally cannot see what is going on to decide when to stop the roast.

You also need distilled water and a mister and a colander.

I would wait on the more expensive roaster. After roasting a bit, you will decide what level of roast you like -- some machines are better for a precise light to medium roast, while others create a better dark roast. You will also decide how much time and effort you want to spend on the roast -- do you like to tinker or are you a set and forget kind of person? Finally, you will have experienced a variety of roasts (which you might not have experienced with a more reproduceable and reliable method) and you will have learned what you really prefer.

Finally, http://www.morecoffeee.com will treat you right. There are other sites out there, but I believe that this site has the best combination of information about its coffees. Casey, the coffee guy, is good about returning e-mails. He was really good about returning my e-mail on the manual coffee grinder, which is not as coarse as I would like, but is darn consistent, and an excellent if slow conical burr grinder for under $25.
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Postby cooldaddybeck » Mon Feb 12, 2007 7:42 am

I get by with the WP and air popper using my stove's vent. However, I'm going to start using the air popper in the garage because it creates much more smoke, in my opinion, than the WP.
Water, Grain, Hops, Yeast: combine, age, consume.

"You remind me of that scene from Zoolander....the one where the male models are dancing while spraying each other with gasoline..."
~SWMBO

"If there is anything that this horrible tragedy can teach us, it's that a male model's life is a precious, precious commodity. Just because we have chiseled abs and stunning features, it doesn't mean that we too can't not die in a freak gasoline fight accident. " ~Derek Zoolander
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Stainless Steel crank popper

Postby WashingtonPeaberry » Fri Jun 01, 2007 8:11 pm

I decided on the stainless steel version of the Whirly-Pop (has a diff name, something like "Back to Basics" or the like...

I use it outdoors on the side burner of my gas grill and it works very well. I am quite pleased with it. I roast 8, 12 or 16 oz batches, and all of them work very nicely with this popper. I did replace the plastic viewing window with thick aluminum foil form a pie tin after the first three roasts, as it started to warp. This is a common issue for this popper, and is no big deal... it is easy to replace the window.

I've been using an IRoast II for about 6 months, and still like it very much. But the increased capacity of the popper is great. I also find that the roast doesn't go from full city to charcoal in 30 seconds like it sometimes can in the IRoast... the roast progresses a bit more gradually, which I like, with the crank popper. It is definitely a hands-on experience, which I like.

I also think it was helpful to have gotten some experience roasting with the IRoast prior to using this method... but I am sure someone could start out with the popper and do just fine. The only risk is that you could possibly ruin a larger batch. So far, I have been pleased with all of my popper roasts, although the first one or two came out a bit lighter than I usually like. I find that I err more on the side of too light with the crank popper, which was not what I'd have expected from what I'd read from others regarding their use.
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