cold storage

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cold storage

Postby npkeith » Thu Jun 01, 2006 11:16 am

OK, here's a question -

Why am I not supposed to store my coffee in the freezer? (Im talking the roasted stuff, not the green beans). I've been told this several times, but nobody has a good reason why.

Here are the reasons I've heard:
It will pick up funky odors/flavors (I store in glass mason jars. Not an issue)
It makes the beans fracture rather than grind if they're frozen (I let them warm up first, and I have a burr grinder, not a whirley-blade)
It causes the high notes to evaporate off and be lost (?) (cooling slows evaporation, not speeds, and its in an airtight jar - where are the flavors going to go?)

Anybody have a better reason?
-Keith
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Postby Roger456 » Fri Jun 02, 2006 9:34 am

Every time you take them out, condensation will form on the beans. Moisture=bad. If you roast/buy your beans fresh every week, you shouldn't need to freeze the beans.
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Postby npkeith » Fri Jun 02, 2006 10:34 am

that makes sense, and I agree, wet beans bad, but again, storing in an airtight jar.

Condensation forms when warm, moist air hits cold, dry beans. I warm to room temp without opening the jar - where is the moisture coming from?
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Postby johnsma22 » Fri Jun 02, 2006 2:43 pm

There is absolutely nothing wrong with long term storage of coffee beans in an airtight container in the freezer. In fact, it is the preferred method for long tern storage. The problem of moisture condensation on the beans would only be an issue if you were storing coffee that you are using every day in the freezer. ie.. opening container, removing some for use, resealing the container and placing back in the freezer. For daily use, store in an airtight container at room temp, preferably in a dark place.

Just an FYI, people often confuse bitter coffee for strong coffee. For example, Someone may want to make a batch of coffee that is not too strong. In an effort to do so they will reduce the amount of grounds that they use for that batch. What they have just done is expose a smaller amount of grounds to a given amount of boiling water and will over-extract the grounds. When coffee is over extracted there will be volatile oils extracted that will make the batch taste bitter. The best way to do it is to make the coffee with the proper ratio and then just cut it with some more hot water to make it weaker. Just thought you might be interested.

John
Cheers,
John

"There are no stupid questions, but there are a LOT of inquisitive idiots!"
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