priming question

Tips, tricks and techniques regarding brewing with extracts, steeping grains, and partial mash.

Moderator: Moderator Team

priming question

Postby mr.gbu » Sun Feb 02, 2014 11:32 pm

So today I bottled my blonde ale beer. During the process of sanitizing the bucket and equipment I realised that I wasn't sure if I was to just throw the corn sugar into priming bucket and stir with the beer so I went to you tube to find my answer. Apparently they boiled the sugar in water for 5 min in which I did as well except I added about an ounce of home sugar to the boiling water would this damage or have any effect on my beer during carbonation I already did my research but I rather make sure from someone who's knows
User avatar
mr.gbu
Pint Glass (25 posts)
 
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 1:21 pm

Re: priming question

Postby CA_Mouse » Sun Feb 02, 2014 11:57 pm

So that we get this right....

You boiled your water and the 4-5oz packet of priming sugar *and* added about 1oz of table sugar?

OR

You boiled your water with 1oz of table sugar only?

If the first was the case, just make sure to start checking for carbonation a little sooner as there is more sugar for hte yeast to eat. Potentially giving you bottle bombs. Once carbonated to the desired level get them into the fridge to shut off the yeast.

OR

Not enough sugar to carbonate your bottles properly. They may carbonate, but will take an extra long time to finish.
Mouse
-=ô¿ô=-
That which does not kill us makes us stronger. - Friedrich Nietzsche


Primary: Hopping Dead
Secondary: Mead - Cinnamon; Boysenberry; Blackberry; Tart Cherry
Barrel #2: American Barleywine
Secondary: Dark Cherry Sour '13
Secondary: Pom-Cran Sour '13
Keg #1: Bourbon Barrel Oatmeal Stout
Keg #2: Cascade Pale Ale
Keg #3: Berliner Weiss
Keg #4: Cascade Pale Ale
Keg #5: Irish Red
Keg #6: Tart Walking IPA
Keg #7: Dad's Apple Cider
Bottled: Robin's Root Beer
User avatar
CA_Mouse
Keg (750 posts)
 
Posts: 810
Joined: Fri Aug 31, 2012 1:49 pm
Location: Riverside, CA

Re: priming question

Postby mr.gbu » Mon Feb 03, 2014 12:28 am

CA_Mouse wrote:So that we get this right....

You boiled your water and the 4-5oz packet of priming sugar *and* added about 1oz of table sugar?

OR

You boiled your water with 1oz of table sugar only?

If the first was the case, just make sure to start checking for carbonation a little sooner as there is more sugar for hte yeast to eat. Potentially giving you bottle bombs. Once carbonated to the desired level get them into the fridge to shut off the yeast.

OR

Not enough sugar to carbonate your bottles properly. They may carbonate, but will take an extra long time to finish.

Yea the first one is exactly what I did so should I check in about a week to see if its carbonated and will the yeast leave any sediment in the bottom of the bottles?
User avatar
mr.gbu
Pint Glass (25 posts)
 
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 1:21 pm

Re: priming question

Postby Maineac » Mon Feb 03, 2014 4:58 am

The extra sugar may result in the beer being over carbed.
Yes, there will be sediment in the bottom of the bottles.
As noted by CA_Mouse, check the bottles in a week. if they're carbed the way you like, put them somewhere cold.
"The more you read about this Politics thing, you got to admit that each party is worse than the other. The one that's out always looks the best." Will Rogers
Maineac
Corny Keg (500 posts)
 
Posts: 611
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2004 2:38 pm
Location: Central Maine

Re: priming question

Postby turbo_ale » Tue Feb 04, 2014 9:06 am

You did not say how much corn sugar, 4 or 5 oz, plus the 1 oz table sugar, = 5 or 6 oz sugar per 5 gallon beer. I have used 5 oz with no ill effect, just more carbonation. I have not used 6 oz yet.
ON TAP:
1. 1C
2. 4B
3.
4.
5.
6.
Bottled: Gewurztraminer, Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, 16B, 18B, 18E, 19B, 20, 21A, 23, 27
Fermenting:
Next: 5C

BEER, a mixture of malted grains, water, hops and yeast, that is transformed through the course of fermentation that transcends the simplicity of those basic ingredients, fundamentally into the drink of life.
turbo_ale
User avatar
turbo_ale
Micro Brewery (2500 posts)
 
Posts: 2704
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 1:18 pm
Location: Colorado Springs, CO

Re: priming question

Postby CA_Mouse » Tue Feb 04, 2014 3:52 pm

Sediment and yeast - Yes
Test a bottle at 8 days to get an idea where your carbonation level is at. If it needs a bit more, check another bottle at 10- 12 days. It should be fully carbonated by day 14 and stored in a very cool place to ensure the yeast stay asleep.

*NOTE* Even though the log in is CA_Mouse ya'll should call me Mouse. CA is just a locator device attached to my leg...... :mrgreen:
Mouse
-=ô¿ô=-
That which does not kill us makes us stronger. - Friedrich Nietzsche


Primary: Hopping Dead
Secondary: Mead - Cinnamon; Boysenberry; Blackberry; Tart Cherry
Barrel #2: American Barleywine
Secondary: Dark Cherry Sour '13
Secondary: Pom-Cran Sour '13
Keg #1: Bourbon Barrel Oatmeal Stout
Keg #2: Cascade Pale Ale
Keg #3: Berliner Weiss
Keg #4: Cascade Pale Ale
Keg #5: Irish Red
Keg #6: Tart Walking IPA
Keg #7: Dad's Apple Cider
Bottled: Robin's Root Beer
User avatar
CA_Mouse
Keg (750 posts)
 
Posts: 810
Joined: Fri Aug 31, 2012 1:49 pm
Location: Riverside, CA

Re: priming question

Postby dmtaylor » Tue Feb 04, 2014 5:36 pm

With all that extra priming sugar, I would test a bottle after 3-4 days. Might be fully carbed already. If the beer gushes, watch out for bombs. Might possibly need to pop all the caps, re-ferment, and start over, if overcarbonation occurs.
Dave
User avatar
dmtaylor
Pitcher (300 posts)
 
Posts: 412
Joined: Mon Jul 30, 2007 4:54 pm
Location: Two Rivers, WI

Re: priming question

Postby mr.gbu » Tue Feb 04, 2014 7:11 pm

I bottled the beer this last Sunday so I'm planning to pop one open this coming Sunday to see how far along I am with carbonation and turbo ale it was 4oz of corn sugar and 1oz of table sugar all in all its 5oz of sugar my apologises for not including that info now been meaning to ask is it necessary to boil the sugar in water for 5 min or can I just toss all 4oz of sugar in the priming bucket without boiling it with water? And how soft should I be stirring ...stirring wouldn't hurt the yeast right?
User avatar
mr.gbu
Pint Glass (25 posts)
 
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 1:21 pm

Re: priming question

Postby Maineac » Wed Feb 05, 2014 3:56 am

When I was bottling I did not boil the sugar water. I just brought the water to a boil, dissolved the sugar in the water, poured the sugar water in the bottling bucket.
As far as stirring. After racking the beer into the bottling bucket, it is OK to gently/slowly stir the beer and sugar. Stirring won't hurt the yeast. However, stirring vigorously will add oxygen to the beer which is not good.
"The more you read about this Politics thing, you got to admit that each party is worse than the other. The one that's out always looks the best." Will Rogers
Maineac
Corny Keg (500 posts)
 
Posts: 611
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2004 2:38 pm
Location: Central Maine

Re: priming question

Postby turbo_ale » Wed Feb 05, 2014 10:01 am

Maineac wrote:I just brought the water to a boil, dissolved the sugar in the water, poured the sugar water in the bottling bucket.


I always let my sugar water cool down covered till it is within 10 degrees of the beer, don't want to shock the surrounding yeast with 190 degree sugar water.
ON TAP:
1. 1C
2. 4B
3.
4.
5.
6.
Bottled: Gewurztraminer, Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, 16B, 18B, 18E, 19B, 20, 21A, 23, 27
Fermenting:
Next: 5C

BEER, a mixture of malted grains, water, hops and yeast, that is transformed through the course of fermentation that transcends the simplicity of those basic ingredients, fundamentally into the drink of life.
turbo_ale
User avatar
turbo_ale
Micro Brewery (2500 posts)
 
Posts: 2704
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 1:18 pm
Location: Colorado Springs, CO

Re: priming question

Postby mr.gbu » Wed Feb 05, 2014 10:19 am

So you always gotta boil the sugar in water before throwing in the priming bucket just curious on the reason why we have to do this process
User avatar
mr.gbu
Pint Glass (25 posts)
 
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 1:21 pm

Re: priming question

Postby alewife » Wed Feb 05, 2014 1:09 pm

There are a couple of things going on with the need to use both water and boiling for the bottling sugar. One is making sure that the sugar gets dispersed as evenly as possible in your beer. Water helps to do that. This will avoid having some bottles overcarbonated, while others are undercarbed. The next thing is about sanitation. Boiling will get rid of any nasties in the water, etc. And the last thing that comes to my mind is the aeration/oxidation possibilities of using unboiled water. Aeration at the point of bottling can cause unwanted off flavors in your beer. So, that's what's going on with having to make a boiled water sugar solution for bottling your beers-- even dispersion of sugar, sanitation, and lowering the risk of aerating your beer.

There may be other factors, but that's what comes to mind off the top of my head.

Here's Palmer's bottling techniques: (sec. 11.4 is bottling solutions)

http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter11.html

Cheers,

Alewife

PS I always cool my sugar solution to about room temp before adding to my bottling bucket.
On Deck: Irish Heavy, Mother Bunch's Holiday Porter, Dobby's Magic (like Mad Elf)

In primary:

Conditioning:

Ready to drink:

Cellared: Hardly Cider (2016)
User avatar
alewife
Barrel (1000 posts)
 
Posts: 1698
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 11:28 am
Location: Northern California

Re: priming question

Postby mr.gbu » Wed Feb 05, 2014 1:24 pm

Awesome makes perfect sense what would be the recommended temp for boiling the water and is 1 cup of water for every 4 oz of sugar for a 5gal of fermented beer correct that's what was said on a you tube video
User avatar
mr.gbu
Pint Glass (25 posts)
 
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 1:21 pm

Re: priming question

Postby turbo_ale » Wed Feb 05, 2014 2:07 pm

mr.gbu wrote:is 1 cup of water for every 4 oz of sugar for a 5gal of fermented beer correct that's what was said on a you tube video


Yes, 1 cup (8oz) water for 4-5 oz sugar per 5 gallon batch.
ON TAP:
1. 1C
2. 4B
3.
4.
5.
6.
Bottled: Gewurztraminer, Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, 16B, 18B, 18E, 19B, 20, 21A, 23, 27
Fermenting:
Next: 5C

BEER, a mixture of malted grains, water, hops and yeast, that is transformed through the course of fermentation that transcends the simplicity of those basic ingredients, fundamentally into the drink of life.
turbo_ale
User avatar
turbo_ale
Micro Brewery (2500 posts)
 
Posts: 2704
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 1:18 pm
Location: Colorado Springs, CO

Re: priming question

Postby pclemon » Wed Feb 05, 2014 4:13 pm

turbo_ale wrote:
Maineac wrote:I just brought the water to a boil, dissolved the sugar in the water, poured the sugar water in the bottling bucket.


I always let my sugar water cool down covered till it is within 10 degrees of the beer, don't want to shock the surrounding yeast with 190 degree sugar water.


While I can see your point I never bothered when I bottled. I was only boiling a cup or two of water, putting it in the bottom of the bucket and racking the beer on top of it. The yeast in the first couple of cups that hit it no doubt died, but within a 1/2 gallon racked on top of it the sugar solution was within a couple of degrees of the rest of the beer.
Pete
pclemon
Micro Brewery (2500 posts)
 
Posts: 4306
Joined: Mon Jul 21, 2008 12:13 pm
Location: Marlborough, MA

Next

Return to Extract & Partial Mash Brewing

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest