Long Term Aging

Tips, tricks and techniques regarding brewing with extracts, steeping grains, and partial mash.

Moderator: Moderator Team

Long Term Aging

Postby A L E X » Sat Jan 17, 2015 6:03 pm

My son is going to go off to college in the fall (yay!) and I want to do a brew before he leaves, and age it out to enjoy when he graduates. Is this possible with a beer, or would wine be a better bet? Anyone ever try something like this?

thanks,
Alex
User avatar
A L E X
Pitcher (300 posts)
 
Posts: 459
Joined: Mon Aug 04, 2008 4:52 am
Location: Northern VA

Re: Long Term Aging

Postby CA_Mouse » Sat Jan 17, 2015 8:12 pm

I've aged Imperial Porters and Sours and they both get better with time and age. Barleywines and Russian Imperial Stouts will also age well.
Mouse
-=ô¿ô=-
That which does not kill us makes us stronger. - Friedrich Nietzsche


Primary: Hopping Dead
Secondary: Mead - Cinnamon; Boysenberry; Blackberry; Tart Cherry
Barrel #2: American Barleywine
Secondary: Dark Cherry Sour '13
Secondary: Pom-Cran Sour '13
Keg #1: Bourbon Barrel Oatmeal Stout
Keg #2: Cascade Pale Ale
Keg #3: Berliner Weiss
Keg #4: Cascade Pale Ale
Keg #5: Irish Red
Keg #6: Tart Walking IPA
Keg #7: Dad's Apple Cider
Bottled: Robin's Root Beer
User avatar
CA_Mouse
Keg (750 posts)
 
Posts: 810
Joined: Fri Aug 31, 2012 1:49 pm
Location: Riverside, CA

Re: Long Term Aging

Postby alewife » Sun Jan 18, 2015 5:25 pm

I've had delicious results holding the higher alcohol Belgian Strong Ales (golden, dubbel, trippel) for a few years. :D

Alewife
On Deck: Irish Heavy, Mother Bunch's Holiday Porter, Dobby's Magic (like Mad Elf)

In primary:

Conditioning:

Ready to drink:

Cellared: Hardly Cider (2016)
User avatar
alewife
Barrel (1000 posts)
 
Posts: 1698
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 11:28 am
Location: Northern California

Re: Long Term Aging

Postby tookalisten » Mon Jan 19, 2015 7:38 am

Just finished a Barleywine that was 3 years old and it was great. I have my grains measured out for another Barleywine (look up Denny's Old Stoner) and a Belgian Strong that I plan to age for several years.
Enjoy the little things, for one day you may look back and realize they were the big things.
~Robert Brault

Primary: RIS, Two Hearted Ale
Kegged: Brown Ale, Citra Pale Ale, JZ's WCB
User avatar
tookalisten
Micro Brewery (2500 posts)
 
Posts: 4849
Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2005 5:29 pm
Location: NC - yall

Re: Long Term Aging

Postby MullerBrau » Mon Jan 19, 2015 10:07 am

I have just over 600 bottles of beer (various sizes) in my BierKeller. The appropriate beers mentioned above age very well if stored properly. I have some which get better for a few years and then decline, yet I have some that will age indefinitely. It is quite a fun hobby to lay beers down for a few years and learn to appreciate the changes that take place.
User avatar
MullerBrau
Barrel (1000 posts)
 
Posts: 2133
Joined: Tue Feb 01, 2005 7:00 pm
Location: Troy, MI

Re: Long Term Aging

Postby A L E X » Wed Jan 21, 2015 3:56 pm

appreciate the responses everybody. I like the idea of an imperial. I have a few more months of research time, good to know I have options
User avatar
A L E X
Pitcher (300 posts)
 
Posts: 459
Joined: Mon Aug 04, 2008 4:52 am
Location: Northern VA

Re: Long Term Aging

Postby Chopper » Fri Jan 23, 2015 10:35 am

I've got a couple bottles left of a RIS that I laid down 5 years ago and everytime I've opened one it seems like its gotten better. I also just rediscovered a box of 22oz bombers of an 04 and 05 Xmas brew that we did -- I opened the 04 the other night and it was spectacular and so much better than earlier in its lifee. The base beer for both was a winter warmer at around 9%.

cheers
Chopper
Liter Mug (100 posts)
 
Posts: 173
Joined: Thu Apr 20, 2006 10:32 am

Re: Long Term Aging

Postby A L E X » Tue Feb 03, 2015 3:41 pm

hmm, is it the higher ABV that makes these stand up over time better? I had an Epic Barleywine over the weekend, it was around 11%, and it kicked my a$$! Didn't really care for the style all that much either.
User avatar
A L E X
Pitcher (300 posts)
 
Posts: 459
Joined: Mon Aug 04, 2008 4:52 am
Location: Northern VA

Re: Long Term Aging

Postby MullerBrau » Wed Feb 04, 2015 4:49 am

A L E X wrote:hmm, is it the higher ABV that makes these stand up over time better? I had an Epic Barleywine over the weekend, it was around 11%, and it kicked my a$$! Didn't really care for the style all that much either.
Both alcohol and hops which big barleywines are known for having massive amounts of each.
User avatar
MullerBrau
Barrel (1000 posts)
 
Posts: 2133
Joined: Tue Feb 01, 2005 7:00 pm
Location: Troy, MI

Re: Long Term Aging

Postby A L E X » Fri Feb 06, 2015 7:55 pm

yeah, lol, I learned the hard way, as usual. I would guess that anything that gets made would keep with the proper storage (constant refrigeration).
User avatar
A L E X
Pitcher (300 posts)
 
Posts: 459
Joined: Mon Aug 04, 2008 4:52 am
Location: Northern VA

Re: Long Term Aging

Postby A L E X » Fri Nov 27, 2015 6:19 pm

UPDATE - I emailed some brewmasters online, got a few responses, but this was by far the best and most informational, so I thouht I would share

Hello, Alex!

There are a few factors that will help a beer stay good for long-term storage, and a few recipe-based things that in my experience age poorly that can be avoided. That said, four years is a long time and even some world-class professionally made beers meant for aging have difficulty standing up that long- brewing up a batch to drink four years later is quite the undertaking.
First, the things in your recipe to avoid. High alpha-acid late addition hops will often oxidise fairly rapidly(6 months), at best fading away to nothing, or more likely imparting cardboardy flavours. Conversely, mid-to-late boil hops with higher beta acid hops (usually hops that have low alpha acid levels, if your supplier does not list beta acid content) will hold up better over time. Crystal malts also have a tendency to not age well and should likewise be avoided. Oxygen in general is going to be your main adversary, and anything you can do to avoid its introduction to your wort/beer will be important. Also, ensuring proper sanitisation is even more important for a long term project: tiny cell counts of unanticipated bacteria or wild yeast that could go wholly unnoticed in a short-to-medium term project can completely sabotage a beer over the years. df
Along with avoiding your beer being oxidized, there are two main preserving factors you can take advantage of: a high alcohol content, and a high level of acidity. A means of achieving both acidity and avoiding oxidization is to co-ferment your beer with your favourite yeast strain and one or more strains of Brettanomyces. Brett has the distinct advantage of fermenting very slowly long after you have bottled your beer, and will inhale oxygen released by various compounds in your beer as they break down over time. To be honest, I cannot imagine a way for a lower alcohol beer to stay good for four years without being Brett-fermented. As Brettanomyces slowly ferments, it will continue to produce CO2 and so if you employ it and carbonate your bottles as normal, they will certainly explode a year or three down the line. If you mash at ~155 F, I am sure you could bottle your beer flat and still have a high carbonation level by the time your son graduates. If you have never brewed a Brett beer before, I recommend you do a bit of research beforehand to at least figure our which strain you might like to use- there is plenty of good information to be found online, or I can recommend to you the book American Sour Beers, written by Michael Tonsmeire.

I wish you the best of luck, and let me know if there is anything more I can do for you!

This some info on him if you are interested - http://craftbeergut.com/5/post/2014/11/ ... rewer.html
User avatar
A L E X
Pitcher (300 posts)
 
Posts: 459
Joined: Mon Aug 04, 2008 4:52 am
Location: Northern VA


Return to Extract & Partial Mash Brewing

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 3 guests