A good bread recipe

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A good bread recipe

Postby Hammers986 » Mon Nov 01, 2004 9:03 pm

Anybody got a good "how too" beer bread recipe from spent grains? The wife and I love dark beers and bread.

Cheers,
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Postby alewife » Wed Apr 06, 2005 4:31 pm

I have made bread from spent grains! It is very....hearty.... shall we say! I notice the date of your request is last summer. If you are still interested, let me know and I will give you what I came up with! Alewife
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Postby alewife » Wed Apr 06, 2005 8:20 pm

I'm "alewife" because I got into beer (ale) brewing because of my interest in medieval history. Frugality like this was common among the lower classes in that era. Actually, these loaves, although rough, are quite flavorful. Originally, I was looking for a way to produce the "trenchers" that were the common "plates" of the dark ages and early medieval period. I hope there is an experienced bread maker around, because my recipe counts on your experience with yeast doughs. Here's how I made my "rustic" bread loaves from my spent grains:

NOTE: Update: This recipe is based on grains available from an "all grain" brew! It has not been tested on extract adjunct grain brews or partial mash grain brews. I will work on developing a partial mash spent grain option. :)

Ale Grain Bread (I often use the grains from a British Bitter batch)

2 envelopes regular bread yeast (Fleischman's)
1 cup warm water
1/2 tsp sugar to proof

Mix above together and allow to sit 5-10 minutes to prove the yeast works! If it's foamed up, it's working!


1/2 cup honey
1/2 cup oil (vegetable or olive)
4 T softened butter
1 tsp salt

Blend above ingredients together in large bowl with wooden spoon until smooth. Set aside.


3 cups leftover (spent) ale grain
1 cup water

Place in bowl of food processor and process until chunky but not too smooth! I did not puree it. It doesn't really puree anyway!

Place into bowl with honey mixture.

Repeat process with another 3 cups grain and l cup water. (This could have been accomplished with a large mortar and pistle in the old days)

Blend processed grains and honey mixture together with wooden spoon.

Stir in proofed yeast mixture.

Next add 5-6 cups whole wheat flour, 1 cup at a time, to grain/honey mixture. Stir until flour incorporated before adding next cup.

Add 2 cups white flour, 1 cup at a time to above mixture. This should be getting stiff enough to knead about now. If not, add more flour, white or wheat.

Knead with 1-2 cups more white flour (or whatever it takes) until it is no longer sticky and dough is springy and resilient.

Allow dough to rise in warm place until double in volume. Punch down, and knead with with 1 cup or so additional whole wheat flour. Let rest 10 minutes. Shape into loaves. I made 8 round, but flatter, trencher shapes, or it could also make 4 traditional round loaves, or 4 traditional loaf pans, or however many little "rolls" that you'd like.

Set these to rise in warm place. When doubled, bake in a preheated 350 deg. oven until done--depending on size of loaves or rolls, this could be 15 to 50 minutes or more! Brush with butter if you want a softer crust before, and/or after baking.

Like I said, flavor is great, texture is nutty and chewy, but even with all of this extra flour, these are "rustic" products with the same effect as bran muffins! So, monitor your consumption, if you get my drift!

Looking back, I guess you could halve this recipe, but then you would be using only 3 cups of all that leftover ale grain! And, though not totally medieval, this process worked!

If you have questions, write back! Beer (ale) making is an extension of "cooking" for me, and I cook a lot......Beer is is cooking, beer is food--and, an ancient one, like bread!

Alewife

P.S. I have put a streamlined version of this recipe at the end of this thread. It makes just 2 loaves of spent grain bread and can be made in stages. Pic included.
Last edited by alewife on Sun Nov 04, 2012 10:45 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby alewife » Wed Apr 06, 2005 8:24 pm

OOPS! Repeat processing of spent grains and water only once.... for a total of 6 cups grain and 2 cups water. Sorry. This recipe has never been written down. Alewife
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Postby Yabodie » Fri Sep 15, 2006 5:56 pm

Alewife,
I tried your bread recipe and damn it is good!!! Also your disclaimer is a valid one too!! Tons of fiber, if you know what I mean...

Thanks!!!
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Postby alewife » Fri Sep 15, 2006 7:25 pm

Thanks for letting me know! :) I appreciate the "feedback", heh heh! :wink: It's interesting the way each different grain bill will affect flavor, etc. too. I guess I should look at revising the proportions in the recipe so its effect is not so much like too many bran muffins! But then, it would use less spent grains!

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Postby Theosophist » Sat Sep 16, 2006 7:38 am

What do trenchers have to do with bread? Mine are a single piece wood squared up, hollowed somewhat and scraped smooth. Do you sleep in a slight depression in the back yard? What is your favorite bedding? Mine is pine needles with a layer of sassafrass leaves for a bottom sheet.
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Postby alewife » Sat Sep 16, 2006 9:57 am

:lol: You're such a kidder!!!! What you describe is a late version "trencher", done in wood. The short story is that earlier, before wood trenchers and plates became common, dinner was served on a large slab of bread -- the first "trenchers." Upper levels of medieval society ate off trenchers as well, but did not actually eat the trencher bread. The leftover bread, with bits of food and gravy on it, was given to servants and/or street people waiting outside the castles. There was even an elaborate protocol about what slice of the loaf became your trencher at castle dinners-- The highest ranking got the top slice -- the "upper crust". See, it all makes sense now, right???

BTW, I live a in a regular ol' 4 bedroom, 2 bath typical California ranch style house and hate camping! No pine needle beds for me! :wink:

Enjoy, Alewife
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Postby MaltnHopsrGood » Sun Nov 18, 2007 6:50 pm

Alewife, I tried this recipe. I don't know if it was the spent grains that I used or what, but it wasn't very good.

I used the spent grains from a B3 extract porter kit. Black patent, and chocolate malt does not make for a good bread. :cry:

Next time, I'll try it with some lighter grain and let you know how it turns out.
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Postby alewife » Sun Nov 18, 2007 7:30 pm

I've never tried it with anything darker than a fairly dark British pale ale. You're probably right, it could be there was just too much dark grain, especially since you used an extract kit without the usual large amount of regular pale malt in an all grain recipe to counter the dark grains.

I'm glad you brought this up, because I developed this recipe using the spent grains from all grain recipes. Actually, I'd have to look at the adjunct grains on extract kits to see if any of them would be appropriate. Probably, several of the partial mash kits would work. But that will take some research and recipe comparison.

Several others on the board have been quite successful with this recipe using spent grain from all grain recipes. I'm sorry you weren't successful this time! :cry: I know you put a lot of time and energy into it.

Will post a revision at a later time for partial mash recipes. Right now I'm actually stirring up the crescent roll dough for Thanksgiving! :wink:

Enjoy your holiday!

Alewife

P.S. I did edit the above recipe to state that it is designed for use with spent grains from an all grain recipe. Again, thanks for letting me know.
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Postby Liquid Bread » Tue Nov 20, 2007 10:19 am

Dumb question for Alewife: How long will spent grains last before going rancid? I'd imagine I'd get at least a couple days if I store the grains in the fridge.

My plan is to brew a Dark Mild on Friday and then use some of the spent grains for a fruit cake that I'll prepare later this weekend.

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Postby MaltnHopsrGood » Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:48 pm

[quoteI'm sorry you weren't successful this time! :cry: I know you put a lot of time and energy into it.quote]

Don't be sorry. It turned out to be a good teaching time for my daughter and I. I showed her the dough, and then showed her the dough after it had risen. She had all kinds of questions about yeast. She really liked it when she punched the dough, and it "deflated." She laughed really hard at that! :D She said that punching it was the best part.

Thanks for the recipe. It led to time well spent with my daughter. :D
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Postby alewife » Tue Nov 20, 2007 7:00 pm

Liquid Bread wrote:Dumb question for Alewife: How long will spent grains last before going rancid? I'd imagine I'd get at least a couple days if I store the grains in the fridge.

My plan is to brew a Dark Mild on Friday and then use some of the spent grains for a fruit cake that I'll prepare later this weekend.

Adrian


Well. when I make a sour mash for beers like Flying Fish's Farmhouse Summer Ale -- you get the action going in 2-3 days at room temps. It would probably last longer in the fridge, but I would want you to use it as quickly as possible, just to be on the conservative side -- unless you're looking to make a sourdough, of course!

I kind of wonder about using the grains in a fruitcake--the spent grains are very fibrous like I said in the recipe, not sure if you would end up liking the texture of the fruitcake, just as a mouthfeel thing.... As I mentioned above, even with a food processor, it's hard to get a really smooth puree with the spent grains. And, with fruitcake, the batter is really just there to hold the fruit together for the most part. So, I also wonder if using the spent grains would make a fruit cake that would be difficult to slice without falling apart. However, I think making the fruitcake with a bottle of that dark mild as part of the liquid in the fruitcake might work quite nicely! :wink:

Let us know how all your experiments turn out!

Alewife

P.S. My family really enjoys the Pizza Crust recipe! It's only downside is that it is labor intensive and only uses up just a cup of the spent grain, though! Definitely stick with a lighter grist with that recipe, too.
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Re: A good bread recipe- Revisited

Postby alewife » Mon Aug 27, 2012 12:55 pm

So, I thought it may be time to share my more streamlined version of spent grain bread that has evolved over the past few years. First, I've cut the recipe down by half. It now makes just 2 loaves of bread, either hand shaped or placed in standard bread pans. And, I'm using my Kitchenaid mixer with a dough hook rather than a big bowl with a wooden spoon! Also, so that I didn't have to brew and bake bread on the same day, I found that scooping out the 3 cups of spent grains (well drained) and storing them in the fridge overnight in a ziplock bag, worked out just fine! I also found that the spent grains from BYO's Tudor Beer (the April '12 issue), with its combination of malted barley, wheat and oats, makes a delicious bread!

Alewife's Spent Grains Bread-- Updated version

3 cups well, drained spent grains (darker, roastier grains do not work as well)
1 cup water

3 cups whole wheat flour, 12.75 oz by weight (white wheat is good, too)
3-1/2 cups all purpose or bread flour, 14.88 oz by weight

1 T instant dry yeast (see note below)
1 cup water
1/4 cup honey (you can sub sugar here or use a combo of DME and sugar)

2 tsp. salt

2 T. butter
2 T. oil (olive or vegetable)

Combine spent grains and 1 cup water in food processor. Process until grain is broken down well but not a complete puree. Place in bowl of mixer with yeast, flours, additional water and honey. With dough hook, on lowest speed, blend ingredients together for 4 minutes. Cover bowl and let stand for 15-20 minutes, allowing flour to hydrate. Sprinkle salt over dough in bowl and mix on level 2 speed for 4 minutes. Add butter and oil. Continue to mix on level 2 speed for another 5 minutes until butter/oil is well incorporated. Dough is fairly moist and can be somewhat sticky.

Scrape dough from bowl onto lightly floured surface and knead by hand just a few minutes until it takes shape, but is still soft and resilient. Resist the temptation to add much extra flour here. If it's too sticky to handle, make sure your hands are either well floured or lightly oiled. Or, use a bench scraper to fold and turn the dough at the beginning, until you can manage the dough by hand. A light hand with the flour will help make a lighter loaf of bread--a good thing because this bread already has so much whole grain in it!

Clean out your mixing bowl and lightly oil it. Gather dough into a ball and place in bowl, flipping it over to make sure top of dough has light film of oil. Cover with clean towel and allow dough to rise at cool room temperature until about doubled in volume. This will take a couple of hours depending on the warmth of your kitchen.

When dough has risen, turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Cut evenly into 2 pieces. Turn edges of dough under around each piece, deflating dough as you do. Cover lightly with towel, and allow dough to rest about 15 minutes. After dough has rested, shape each piece into round or regular loaf shapes. Allow loaves to rise again until almost doubled. Preheat your oven well ahead of time to 475 degrees.

When ready to bake, slash top of loaves-- a couple of diagonal slashes on a standard loaf, and a tic tac toe or other pattern on a round. If you want a crustier bread, spritz with water before placing in oven. Bake at 475 for 5 minutes, optionally spritzing with water at beginning and end of the 5 minutes. Turn oven down to 425 degrees and bake 20 more minutes. Check the loaves and rotate in oven if necessary for even browning. Bake 5-15 minutes more until loaves are nicely browned and reach an internal temperature of 200 degrees.

Remove baked loaves from oven and allow to cool well before slicing. If bread seems too crusty or you just want a softer crust, loaves can be brushed with olive oil or butter as they cool.

Notes: About the dry yeast-- if you use regular active dry yeast, you can hydrate it in 1/2 cup of the additional 1 cup water before adding to flour mixture. This step is not necessary with the instant yeast.

DME in bread--a couple of tablespoons can be substituted for part of the sugar. It will feed your yeast well and give a moister, slower staling loaf of bread, as well as imparting a bit of sweetness.

You can also do the first rising in the refrigerator. It will take 6-12 hours. Overnight works well for baking the next morning. Cover the top of your mixing bowl tightly with a couple of layers of plastic wrap. This method has the extra advantage of letting you shape your bread with a nice, cool, unsticky dough!

If you don't want to fuss as much with the baking of the bread, you can also bake it for about an hour at 350 degrees. Check it about half way though and rotate if needed. Temperature should still be at 200 degrees at end of baking. Remember that individual ovens vary a lot, so experience with your own oven is important. As with beer, bread is done when it's done and not when the timer may say it is. :wink:

Let me know if you have any questions.

Alewife

PS I'll post a pic of my latest loaf as soon as I figure out how to get it off my iPhone...
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Re: A good bread recipe

Postby alewife » Mon Aug 27, 2012 6:02 pm

Here's a picture of my last batch!

Image
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